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Category — Policy Analysis

Gamasutra Feature: Litigations that Changed Games Industry

Categories: Featured ArticlesPolicy Analysis

Gamasutra Feature: Litigations that Changed Games Industry by Gregory Boyd

Sources: Gamasutra

A related article is “My Three Trials” by Bill Kunkel where he describes his experiences as an expert witness in three historic video game trials. The Article is in three pieces:

  • Part 1 – Atari v. Magnavox
  • Part 2 – Nintendo v. Galoob
  • Part 3 – Capcom v. Data East

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Congressman Joe Pitts Claims his Video Game Comments were Misportrayed in Daily Show Lampoon

Categories: Game RatingsHumourLegal ReformPolicy AnalysisViolent Game Laws

After raising many eyebrows with his comments, Congressman Joe Pitts claims his statements on the affects of violent video games on children aired in a June 22 Daily Show segment were misportrayed.

Sources: DailyLocal.com | GamePolitics | Joystiq | YouTube Video (snippet)

Click here to view YouTube video.

Dale’s Comment: It’s hard to understand how Congressman’s Pitt’s comments could have been misportrayed. They were aired uncut. This is simply another example of a (probably) well intentioned, aging, out of touch Senator speaking on a subject he does not understand. Sounds like Washington as usual to me.

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Jon Stewart on Congressional Debate over Video Games

Categories: Game RatingsHumourLegal ReformPolicy AnalysisViolent Game Laws

In this Daily Show clip, Jon Stewart lampoons Congressman Joe Pitts’ Lack of understanding of the video game industry, affects of violence on children and the ESRB rating system.

Sources: YouTube Video (snippet) | joystiq | GamePolitics | Gamasutra | GameIndustry.biz

Click here to view YouTube video.

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Congress, FTC Discuss Video Game Rating System

Categories: Legal ReformPolicy Analysis

Views Clash at Senate Game Hearing

Categories: Policy AnalysisViolent Game Laws

A U.S. Senate’s Judiciary Subcommittee held a hearing designed to publicly discuss the issue of laws restricting game sales. Titled “What’s in a Game? Regulation of Violent Video Games and the First Amendment,” the hearing saw two panels of four testify on the impact violent video games have on children and how games are–or aren’t–protected as free speech under the U.S. Constitution

Sources: Next Generation | GameSpot | Gamasutra | GameDaily.biz | GamePolitics.com

GamePolitics.com’s Full Coverage Video Game Legislative Activities in Congress
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Regulating Youth Access to Violent Video Games: Three Responses to First Amendment Concerns

Categories: Featured ArticlesPolicy AnalysisViolent Game Law CasesViolent Game Laws

(first published October 2, 2003)
Text of Paper
Abstract: Recent efforts to limit the access of children to violent video games have faced legal challenge under the First Amendment. This article presents three theories that may provide defenses to constitutional challenges. The evidence of harmful effects is examined to argue that limitations may meet strict scrutiny. The theory that violence may fit within harmful to minors statutes ordinarily directed at pornography is also presented. Lastly, the argument that video game play is not expression protected by the amendment is explored.”.
Source: by Kevin W. Saunders

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Senate Panel OKs Video Game Study

Categories: Policy AnalysisViolent Game Laws